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FLU VACCINATIONS We are offering the QUADRIVALENT flu vaccination. Which protects against 4 strains of the INFLUENZA VIRUS.

Flu vaccination drop in clinics happen on THURSDAY AFTERNOONS 1.30 till 5.00 through out October and November. We also offer Saturday morning clinics on 14th October and 11th November from 8.30 to 11.30.  You do not need an appointment for this drop in clinic. If you are eligible for other vaccinations such as Shingles or Pneuovac these may be given at the same time.

CHILDHOOD FLU VACCINATIONS. All children born between 1st September 2013 and 31st August 2015, or eligible patients who are under 18's that have a chronic disease can also have the nasal flu vaccination at the surgery. 

PRESCRIPTION REQUESTS

Please click here for more information on how to order your repeat prescription. PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU ARE NO LONGER ABLE TO EMAIL PRESCRIPTION REQUESTS. This is due to the fact that the email address is not secure and should not be used for patient sensitive information.

Emergency Treatment after RTA's.

If you are seen at the surgery for emergency treatment after a road traffic accident you will be required to pay a fee of £21.30 which can be claimed back under the drivers insurance, see the main page for Further Information 

YELLOW FEVER CENTRE

We are now a Yellow Fever Centre and can offer Yellow Fever vaccinations to anyone who requires this.  You do not have to be a patient here to receive a Yellow Fever vaccination. Please contact the surgery to arrange an appointment with the nurse. The cost is £59.59 - this is for the vaccination and the certificate, payable in cash only at reception

UPCOMING CLOSURE DAYS

We will be closed on the following Bank Holidays in 2017:- 25th December, 26th December.

Click here for a full list of days the Surgery will be closed.

OOH SERVICE HAS CHANGED

The Out Of Hours service (OOH) has changed. Please call 111. Click here for more information.

SYSTMONLINE IS NOW ACTIVE

Please click here for more information. 

Vaccinations

Through out your life you will may require different vaccinations to protect you against illness. These may change depending on your current situation, health or age. 

Keep reading for information on Childhood immunisation schedule, influenza vaccination and vaccinations during pregnancy.  

Children's Immunisation Schedule

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

2 months:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children) given as a 5-in-1 single jab known as DTaP/IPV/Hib
  • Pneumococcal infection
  • Meningitis B
  • Rota-virus (Gastroenteritis)

immunisation3 months:

  • 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Rota-virus, second does (rota)

4 months:

  • 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose
  • Meningitis B

12 months:

  • Meningitis B, third dose
  • Meningitis C / Hib, fourth dose (Hib/MenC given as together in one injection)
  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella all given as together in one injection)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose

3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

  • MMR second jab
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster

Around 12-13 years:

  • Cervical cancer (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only): three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab
  • Meningitis ACWY

65 and over:

  • Flu (every year)
  • Pneumococcal

70 - 80 years:

  • Shingles

HPA Childrens Vaccination Schedule

Click here for the recommended HPA vaccination schedule


Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses. Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Healflujabsth Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

  • people aged 65 or over,
  • people with a serious medical condition
  • people living in a residential or nursing home
  • the main carers for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
  • healthcare or social care professionals directly involved in patient care, and
  • those with a BMI greater than 40.

VACCINATIONS DURING PREGNANCY

Pregnant women & the Flu Vaccination

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in. This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.  

Whooping Cough Vaccinations will be offered to Pregnant Patients who are 28 - 38 weeks pregnant.

 
pregnant_lady1You will receive your Flu Vaccinations Letter via the post to ask you to come to the Surgery. Those Pregnant patients who are within 28-38 weeks of their pregnancy, please ask the Nurse who is giving you the Flu Vaccination, for the Whooping Cough Vaccination on the day.
 
In the UK, all pregnant women are now to be offered vaccination against whooping cough when they are 28-38 weeks pregnant. Getting vaccinated while you’re pregnant could help to protect your baby from developing whooping cough in its first few weeks of life. Children are vaccinated against whooping cough at two, three and four months of age, and again before starting school at about three years and four months of age. Read more about preventing whooping cough here.

Although the number of cases of whooping cough has fallen dramatically since vaccination began, it is still possible for children to get the infection, so having the vaccination is vital.

The more people vaccinated against whooping cough the less chance there is of them passing on the infection to a young baby in which it could cause serious, and possible fatal, complications.
The effectiveness of the whooping cough vaccination may fade over time meaning it is possible to develop the condition during adulthood if you were previously vaccinated.

For more information, please click here.

 
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